Webster & Associates

Janie Fricke

Country Artist Janie Fricke Turns Passion into Second Career Janie Fricke Collection available at JanieFrickeCollection.com

janiecollectionDALLAS, TX (July 2, 2015) – Janie Fricke, a two-time “CMA Female Vocalist of the Year,” past Grammy nominee, and a voice of some of the most recognizable advertising jingles ever, has yet another passion, textiles and fabrics.

The Janie Fricke Collection is a line of fine home accents, whose fabrics are personally selected and cut by Janie herself to create one of a kind designs. Janie has turned her life-long knowledge of fabric and sewing skills, a family tradition, into the Janie Fricke Collection. This specialized high end brand of products includes decorative pillows, throws, table runners, seasonal items as well as a line of customized “bling” items that she terms “ranch chic.”

“My mother and grandmother sewed so I've been doing this since I was very young,” says Fricke. “They never really taught me but I just watched and started to pick up on it, and have always made my own designs. I've made things for friends and family for years but someone pushed me to start my own collection and it’s turned into a second career.”

JFC is carried in specialty boutiques around the country and is showcased in the Dallas, TX showroom Touch of France, located in the prestigious Dallas World Trade Center. Items are available at JanieFricke.com for retail and wholesale market buyers. With the popularity of her line, Janie has recently launched janiefrickecollection.com specifically for professional interior designers highlighting her products and fabrics.

“Touch of France has been a great place to showcase my goods, especially during the Dallas Total Home and Gift Market which begins June 24, 2015. Buyers from all parts of the country converge in Dallas to purchase goods to supply major retail outlets. I am constantly working juggling my music career and working on this line of home goods,” continued Fricke. “I've always been a performer so building this whole other business on top of that has been a challenge but it’s great to share my other creative outlet.”

Raised on a farm in Indiana, Fricke began singing in church, and later turned that talent into a career which began as one of the marketing industry's most successful jingle singers. Long before her success as a country artist, millions of people became familiar with Fricke’s voice through ads for United Airlines, Coca-Cola, 7-Up, and Red Lobster. She soon became a session singer where she was singing background in the studio with some of the biggest country stars of the late 70’s and early 80’s, including Loretta Lynn, Eddie Rabbitt, Crystal Gayle, Ronnie Milsap, Barbara Mandrell, and Mel Tillis.

After a string of duets with such greats as Merle Haggard and Moe Bandy, Fricke landed a solo recording contract in the early 80’s and scored several hit singles, including “Don't Worry 'Bout Me Baby,” “He's a Heartache” and “You're Heart's Not In It.” She won CMA’s coveted “Female Vocalist of the Year” in 1983 and ’84 and has been nominated for three Grammy Awards. She has been credited with over 1,600 album projects and scored 36 hit singles.

# # #

Last Updated on Thursday, 02 July 2015 07:41

Hits: 26

Country Stars React to Passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:

 

Dolly Parton reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
“I often perform one of Little Jimmy’s best known songs “I’m Little But I’m Loud.” I’ve always related to him and loved him as a person, as a friend, and as an entertainer. He will always be loved and remembered.” -- Dolly Parton

Charlie Daniels reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
"Little Jimmy Dickens has long been a musical hero of mine and one of the finest entertainers to ever step on any stage.I was deeply honored to call him a friend and will always remember the time I got to spend with him The music world has lost one of our greatest treasures. Rest in peace my little friend. You were loved by so many of us." -- Charlie Daniels

TG Sheppard reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
"The music industry has lost one of it's biggest treasure's. He continued inspiring me from our first meeting over 35 years ago up until just recently while visiting with him backstage at The Grand Ole Opry. He always made me feel like a kid in his presence. With his passing I suddenly feel a little older. I loved being around him whether at his home, at the Opry or on the road doing shows. I will miss him greatly as well as everyone else who was honored enough to have known him. In my eyes he was the tallest man I've ever known. He might have been small in stature but was truly a Giant to those that knew him."—TG Sheppard

Ronnie McDowell reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
“The last time that I was on the Grand Ole Opry, Little Jimmy Dickens introduced me. When I heard he passed my heart was saddened. It's the end of an Era and I have lost another hero.”

Andy Griggs reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
"The greatest story teller that has ever spoken, the world's most amazing jokester causing the deepest enormous laughs, the magnetic voice that lasted longer and stronger than a mighty oak, a lifelong history that was taller and more vast than the East Tennessee mountains, the magnificent friendship that everyone will carry in their hearts for eternity, the LARGEST MAN that repeatedly for decades swept the hungry multitude away from his very own pulpit of the Grand Ole Opry Stage. The sweetest Colossal personality with such a huge presence that stood before his Mentors as an immense Hero and Star ,all wrapped up inside of such a gentle and small frame of a man that we'll always remember as "LITTLE" Jimmy Dickens. Let the heavens now witness your gigantic spirit just as we have!!!!!"

Leroy Van Dyke reacts to Little Jimmy Dickens passing:
“I first saw Little Jimmy Dickens in 1952 when he played a county fair at Ft. Smith, Arkansas. I did not get to meet him, but the experience was indelible. I was in basic training at Camp Chaffee and never dreamed that four years later we would be sharing the same stages all over North America.
Jimmy was the consummate entertainer, the benchmark that novice entertainers strove to attain. He was a triple-threat man . . . delightful with his novelty songs, masterful in his emotional interpretation of serious ballads and incomparable in his punch-line timing for humorous dialogue. In those days newcomers to show business and veteran performers alike stood in the wings to see and hear what he would do next . . . and we all learned from him.
Perhaps it would be unreasonable to expect ‘Tater’ to prevail more than 94 years, certainly each of us has our time to depart; but though he has left us, his body of work will live forever in the annals of country music.”

Jimmy Fortune reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
"Every time I played the Opry and Little Jimmy was there, he always made sure he came over to encouraged me and tell me how much he liked my singing and that he was proud of me for continuing on after the Statler Brothers. That meant a lot to me coming from such an icon. He was was a small man in stature but he had a big heart, big talent and big shoes that will never be filled in this business. We will all miss him."

Lorrie Morgan reacts to passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
“Jimmy was always so kind to me as a child backstage at the Opry. I so admired his ability to entertain and make people laugh. My father George Morgan and Jimmy were best of friends and came to the Opry in the same year. It was a close family back then and thanks to Little Jimmy it continued to feel that way when he was in the building. He always made me feel that he loved me. I will miss him.”

Janie Fricke reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
“When we did a show with Little Jimmy a couple years ago, I was amazed at his tenacity and love for the business of performing and entertaining the audience. My band backed him up that night, and we will always have that great memory with us, a wonderful night to remember.“

Larry Black of Larry’s Country Diner reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
“At 6'1" I looked up to the 4'11"Little Jimmy Dickens. I never ask him to do anything that he didn't deliver in abundance.“

Richard Young of the ACM/CMA/GRAMMY-winning group, The Kentucky Headhunters, recalls:
"I was introduced to Little Jimmy at a charity softball game during CMA Fest at the Nashville Sounds baseball field. He told me he liked our music, and not to change our 'get up,' referring to our ragtag 70s dress code. During that game, I hit seven foul balls in a row. Jimmy was the umpire, and always being the showman that he was, he said, 'You're out headhunter. Take a tater and sit down!' We loved to watch him play that giant J-200 Gibson guitar. He was a little man with a big guitar, and an even bigger heart." - Richard Young, The Kentucky Headhunters

Mickey Gilley reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
“When I first met Jimmy at the Opry years ago, he went out of his way to make me feel welcome. He was an incredibly funny man as well as a warm and sincere human being. It was a pleasure and honor to call him my friend. He will be missed.”

Hank Williams Jr. reflects on Little Jimmy Dickens:
Little Jimmy Dickens was a friend. He was the last living connection to my father, Hank Williams. My father even nicknamed Little Jimmy “Tater” after his song “Take an Old Cold Tater (And Wait)”. Tater and my father toured Europe together in 1949 as part of a Grand Ole Opry package show that had them performing at US Air Bases. That same year, my father penned “Hey Good Lookin'” specifically for Dickens. A week later he cut the song himself, jokingly telling Tater, "That song's too good for you!"
Being a top entertainer and ‘trend setter’ that only Jimmy could be, he was the first performer to wear a rhinestone Nudie suit on stage at the Grand Ole Opry. Soon after (in 1951) my mother and father opened up “Hank and Audrey’s Corral” a western wear clothing store to supply other Opry stars with their Nudie suits. The famous white suit with the black music notes that my father wore was a Nudie suit. That same year, Tater and my father toured together one last time.
Tater and my father remained friends, but more important to both of them was that they were fishing and hunting buddies until my father died in 1953.
The angel band has added another frontman. Now, my father and Tater can hunt and fish together in paradise.

Rhonda Vincent reacts to the passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
I was honored to know Little Jimmy Dickens. He was always so friendly when I would greet him backstage at the Grand Ole Opry. One of my treasured possessions is a 78 record I found of Little Jimmy in my grandmother's old Victrola. He signed it for me, not that long ago. He was one of the greatest entertainers that ever appeared on the Grand Ole Opry or any Country Music Show around the World! -- Rhonda Vincent

Crystal Gayle reacts to passing of Little Jimmy Dickens:
Country Music has lost a true giant and part of its history. I will miss Jimmy's gentle soul and wonderful smile.

Last Updated on Friday, 09 January 2015 19:07

Hits: 1615

Janie Fricke - Honoring Bob Kingsley

i5sl25Kbh 8iB3QNv-g EiNCqwAx-kW-e5cjQIjGNeAe5BDFPLgSAiIo4DSQTEy08KGE1S aL1QDtpvM76PtnkFYI, in case you want to get caught up on the reason I came in to Nashville: it was a star studded night, all surprise for Bob Kingsley, who watched us have #1 records for over 50 years!
He had no idea what singers would be there, so we each told a personal story about how he and country radio have shaped and touched our lives. As a new artist , We all listened to his countdown and hoped our record would be # 1 ! The audience consisted of Industry WHO's WHO, so as I sang IT AIN'T EASY, I was so nervous because of the special occasion and the unusual setting, a private dinner party on the STAGE of the Grand Ole Opry . A night to remember, when I got big hugs from Reba, Alabama, Garth Brooks and Trisha, and others.

Janie

Last Updated on Thursday, 20 February 2014 20:28

Hits: 438

Read more...

Bio & Links

Download Photos

12
34
countryside sm
© 2014 Webster Public Relations is a division of Webster & Associates, llc.